Lost in translation: Manoeuvring through the complex world of regulatory language

The regulatory process is complex and can be very difficult to navigate. It’s not just about gathering data and meeting milestones, but also about understanding the regulatory language.

Often,  young biopharma companies come to me after completing a scientific advice procedure with the regulators and are under the impression that the agency in question have agreed to their proposal or that they have the desired answers and are following an appropriate course of action. Whereas, on examination of the correspondence, that’s not exactly what the authorities have said.

After spending time and money preparing their scientific advice request, it turns out that the questions they put to the authorities either weren’t specific enough, or failed to address a critical component of their development, meaning their product development plan won’t translate into the ‘easy’ approval they are expecting. There are details that may be missed if the question asked doesn’t have the right target, the right focus, or if the company didn’t have the right regulatory support to help them through the process.

Unfortunately, if left too late, what might have started out as a simple programme becomes more expensive to do because of early missteps like this. It might mean redoing aspects of clinical and pre-clinical studies because the data doesn’t support the proposed indication or formulation, or improving methods of validation and analysis to improve manufacturing techniques and repeating testing to improve the quality of the data required for the CTD Module 3.

Another issue that many young biopharma companies from the US often confront when entering the EU is just how heterogenous the marketplace is. While regulatory processes are centralised to some extent, each member state has its own requirements with regards to what should be in the submission documents, what data needs to go into a clinical development package, or how standards should be met. That means while there is a core EU submission dossier, there are always different requirements for each EU country.

Understanding what the regulators expect and what will be needed to develop products is highly complex. Understanding how to communicate with the agencies effectively, and ensuring the advice received is clearly understood and incorporated appropriately into the product development plans is an art and a science;  it requires clear knowledge of the product, it’s development, the company’s ambitions for it, the regulatory requirements, and asking detailed questions that are supported by sound data-backed, and scientific justifications. That can be a huge challenge for companies new to the EU market.

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